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14 questions to ask yourself about your nurse recruitment plan

iStock 000016333259XSmall 300x199 14 questions to ask yourself about your nurse recruitment planWhy is it important for your hospital to have a nurse recruitment plan?

  1. It will provide you with a clear picture of the nurse candidate pool in your community
  2. It will give you a chance to evaluate your efforts and determine areas where more money, manpower or ingenuity is required
  3. It lets you establish goals to ascertain how successful your recruiting efforts have been
  4. It will let you see if it is it recruitment or the closing of the hire that is the problem
  5. It will give you quantifiable results you can use to argue the case for more resources to improve your recruiting effectiveness

These questions will help you evaluate your current nurse recruitment plan or establish one if you don’t currently have one in place.

  1. What were your best sources of new hires last year? You are tracking this right?
  2. How effective are your marketing efforts? Which media outlets brought you the best NOI (Nurse on Investment)? Move your budget to focus on only the top performing media avenues for you.
  3. Are job fairs and conferences paying off? How many hires or candidates did they result in? Again only go to those that are performing well and save the expense and manpower of attending those that don’t return on your investment. Also make sure you are utilizing them to their fullest by having nurse managers attend so that interviews and employment offers (assuming qualifying references, health screening, and credentialing verification will be done first of course) can be made on the spot.
  4. How many of your new nurses are coming from your employee referral program? This should be a fairly high number (between 40-60%). If it’s not then consider revamping the program by considering things like offering bonuses to employees and overall just making it more visible to your nurses and emphasize it weekly if not daily.
  5. Take a look at the application process at your hospital. How fast are candidates contacted after they apply? How often are they communicated with?
  6. What about walk-in candidates? Are they sent to an actual nurse recruiter or HR manager who can interview them on the spot? Or at the least answer their questions and arrange for a future interview?
  7. How long does it take to get a new nurse working after she has taken the job? Does that time-frame seem reasonable? What can be done to make it faster?
  8. What is your college outreach program? Do you have regular speaking engagements with the colleges and universities in the area? Do you take part in career days and make sure your positions are posted on their job boards?
  9. Do you have conversations with the local colleges and universities to help them develop curriculum that will deliver more qualified candidates to you?
  10. When is the last time you evaluated the current nurse market in your city and surrounding areas?
  11. When is the last time you looked at your competition who are also looking for nurse candidates in the community?
  12. Are you interviewing those that have turned down a position to find out why? You may find that it they are turning you down because of something that can be easily fixed orchanged or that you need to look at more impactful items like PTO, insurance or pay.
  13. Are you conducting follow-up new hire interviews? 90 days? 6 months?
  14. What about when nurses leave? Are you doing exit interviews to find out why?

Take these 14 items into consideration when looking at your hiring plan to help you evaluate your exisitng nurse recruitment plan or when starting a brand new one.

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About the Author

My name is Jeff Long. I’m the Marketing Manager at Medical Solutions, one of the leading travel nursing companies. I have never been a nurse and am not a recruiter. I have worked at Medical Solutions for five years and think it is a great company that has a lot to offer nurses and allied health professionals interested in a travel career and the hospitals that staff them.